Extracting Black-Scholes implied volatility in Nspire

The Black-Scholes model is an important pricing model for options. In its formula for European call option, the following parameters are required to create a function in the TI Nspire CX:

  • s – spot price
  • k – strike price
  • r – annual risk free interest rate
  • q – dividend yield
  • t – time to maturity
  • v – volatility

blackscholes-newton4

Now that the standard Black-Scholes formula is ready, a common method to derive the implied volatility numerically is to determine a value such that the squared loss function between observed price and calculated Black-Scholes price is zero. To derive this volatility, root finding method like the Newton-Raphson method can easily be implemented with advanced calculators like the TI Nspire. In fact, there is no need to code this feature by utilizing the built-in zeros() function of the CX CAS. This function solve for the selected variable from the input expression so that the result is zero, which is exactly what is needed in this case. The function implied_vola() below is coded to do the squared loss function, which is then passed into the CAS built-in zeros() function. Notice a warning of “Questionable accuracy” is reported for the zeros() function.

blackscholes-newton2

Doing the Newton-Raphson method is simple enough with the Nspire Program Editor. The program below bs_call_vnewtrap() takes a list of Black-Scholes parameters (including the s,k,r,q,t,v), an initial guess value of implied volatility, and the call price of the standard Black-Scholes formula. The last parameter is a precision control (value of zero default to a pre-set value). The last two attempts calling this function shown below depicts the effect of the precision control in this custom root-finding program.blackscholes-newton1

blackscholes-newton3

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